dilettantely

likes. life. library science.

marielikestodraw:

thetpr:

kingerock288:

himteckerjam:

nellasaur:

failarious:

custerdiedforyoursins:

karnythia:

vegtablez:

“You don’t come back in here until you’ve apologized to every person in this room, Because you just exercised a freedom that none of these people of color have. When these people of color get tired of racism, they can’t just walk out, because there’s no place in this country where they aren’t going to be exposed to racism. They can’t even stay in their own homes and not be exposed to racism if they turn on their television. But you, as a white female, when you get tired of being judged and treated unfairly on the basis of your eye color, you can walk out that door, and you know it won’t happen out there. You exercised a freedom they don’t have. If you’re going to be in here you’re going to apologize to every person of color in this room. And do it now.”

“I’m sorry there’s racism in this country—

“BULLSHIT! No, you’re not going to say ‘I’m sorry there’s racism.’ You’re going to apologize for what YOU just did.”

“I will not apologize because it’s not a matter of race always—”

“OUT.”

Jane Elliot is a champ.

I find it fascinating how much some of the white people in the room resisted the idea that racism could hurt POC just for existing & being of color.

Things you do to yourself: piercings, tattoos, hair dye, etc. DON’T FUCKING MATTER IN ANY WAY that is comparable to race. EVER.

“You don’t have the right to say to a person ‘I don’t see you as you are’”.

“You’re denying their reality.”

Taking away power is comparable to death to the white people in the room.

It took until the second half for what was going on here to really click.

Pretty much this.

Jane Elliot has been my fucking hero since I first learned about her in college. You know why?

Because in 1968, after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr, she conducted a little "experiment" with her class of kids in grade school. What she saw illuminated profoundly some of the mechanics of power and oppression, and gave those little white kids the tiniest, most tame taste of what it was like to be a person of color back then.

You can see her exercise in action again, with adults instead of kids, in the video. It’s worth watching.

Jane Elliot goes hard in the paint. She is living proof that whiteness/white culture is no excuse not to “get it”. She is living proof that “It was a different time” doesn’t mean a goddamned thing. She is living proof that there’s an example of what an ally SHOULD be and she is proof that it can be done without worrying about “all white people” or making it about oneself.

Fucking love this woman forever. Most of all because this isn’t a case of her taking credit for something a person of color did, either. She aint no Tim Wise.

Look here privileged people this is how you ally

THANK YOU

always reblog, ALWAYS.

I helped process her papers. They’re held at the Iowa Women’s Archives.

(Source: fishpizza)

quickhits:

Washington Post: “William Allison, 92, came to today’s march with same sign he marched with in ‘63 pic.twitter.com/qT3kL8VlEP via @HamilHarris #MarchonWashington”

quickhits:

Washington Post: “William Allison, 92, came to today’s march with same sign he marched with in ‘63 pic.twitter.com/qT3kL8VlEP via @HamilHarris #MarchonWashington”

(via marielikestodraw)

I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library.

- Jorge Luis Borges

Librarian fact #730: Librarians work in paradise.

(via librarianfacts)

Cross a border, lose your ebooks

wilwheaton:

Jim O’Donnell was at a library conference in Singapore when his Ipad’s Google Play app asked him to update it. This was the app through which he had bought 30 to 40 ebooks, and after the app had updated, it started to re-download them. However, Singapore is not one of the countries where the Google Play bookstore is active, so it stopped downloading and told him he was no longer entitled to his books.

It’s an odd confluence of travel, updates, and location-checking, but it points out just how totally, irretrievably broken the idea of DRM and region-controls for ebooks is.

Meanwhile, someone who got those books some other way, perhaps from a certain Bay, for example, would be able to read them anywhere on the planet, as long as that hypothetical person had electricity.

DRM is stupid, broken, punishes honest people, does nothing to deter piracy, and will never be used by me in any way as long as I am publishing my own works.

(via neil-gaiman)

kateordie:

A new sticker for DCAF this weekend, and a response to the dozen-plus parents who have asked me where we keep the “girl comics” at work so far this summer. Every book is a girl book if the girl can read!

kateordie:

A new sticker for DCAF this weekend, and a response to the dozen-plus parents who have asked me where we keep the “girl comics” at work so far this summer. Every book is a girl book if the girl can read!

lumos5000:

helloyoucreatives:

You are never alone with a good book. This charming campaign is from Grey Tel Aviv. Via Taxi 

this is amazing!!! why have i not seen it before!!

(via gingerbadger)